When your shoes rub against the back of your heels, they cause friction. While our skin can safely handle some friction without pain, like when we scratch an itch, when our shoes cause friction and pressure with every step, it’s only going to end one way: pain and injury.

The result can look like blisters or breaks in the skin, both of which are prone to infection or even the development of bony bumps called a Haglund’s deformity at the back of the heel over time. Depending on the height of your shoes around your ankle, ongoing rubbing may also irritate your Achilles tendon and contribute to bursitis, among other conditions.

To help, our podiatrists have put together a few of their top tips for stopping your shoes from rubbing against the back of your heel.

 

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